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Spiritual Enlightenment: The Damnedest Thing and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Spiritual Enlightenment, the Damnedest Thing: Book One of The Enlightenment Trilogy Paperback – October 2, AUTHOR, TEACHER AND SPIRITUAL MASTER Jed McKenna tells it like.
Table of contents


  • Spiritual Enlightenment: The Damnedest Thing?
  • Reclaiming Goddess Sexuality: The Power of the Feminine Way, Revised Edition.
  • Under the Mistletoe (Lucky Harbor, Book 6.5).
  • Imperfect Thirst.

I doubt the author's real name is Jed McKenna. I doubt any of this is real. And that may very well be the whole point of the book: enlightenment is a crock. Anyone who claims they're enlightened is full of shit. It could very well be that the whole book is a demonstration of this, and Jed McKenna, rather than being some arrogant, enlightened guy, is in fact a fictional character created for the sole purpose of demonstrating how totally B.

In which case, I'd have to say this book is actually quite brilliant. View all 3 comments. Jul 26, Lena rated it really liked it. Well-written and entertaining to read, it offers a valuable perspective on the difference between the kind of yummy, mystical unity experience that most people assume is enlightenment, and what McKenna refers to as actual truth realization, the rather less comfortable process of losing complete identification with your sense of self. The book is so enjoyable to read, it took me a while to notice the numerous contradictions within it.

ISBN 13: 9780980184846

The author spends a lot of time making absolute statements based in the authority of his self-proclaimed enlightenment, while at the same time warning readers to be wary of listening to people like him. While many of his insights feel spot on, I could find no other information on this teacher or his supposed Iowa ashram anywhere.

I find it hard to believe that a teacher so skilled could remain completely under the radar if, he is, in fact a real person. View 1 comment. Feb 16, Daniel Jeffries rated it it was amazing. This book is not for the casual seeker. Be warned. It is a spiritual neutron bomb and it can be a shattering experience. This is for people who have spent their lives looking to understand why they were different and why they were compelled to seek the mythical state of "enlightenment" while their friends and family seemed so much more at home in the world. I spent much of my life on the seeker's path and this book was the final trigger for me.

It is not to be approached lightly. Also the author This book is not for the casual seeker. Also the author is not what you would expect from a spiritual teacher and that is a good thing. He cuts like a hot knife through the bs and wishful thinking of the new age community and pretty much everything else.

Dreamstate: A Conspiracy Theory (The Dreamstate Trilogy) (Volume 2)

Do not let him get in the way of the message. He is but a mouthpiece for the divine. Focusing on the author is yet another distraction in reaching your goal. Just watch out for the first step to enlightenment, it's a doozy. Nov 11, Matt Neputin rated it it was ok.

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This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well this book seems to have mostly positive reviews here, well I would like to add my observations to the mix: Some facts about the book: 1 It's a work of fiction- the author does not exists, there's no ashram, no Jed 2 Just like the actual guru, U. Krishnamurti the author repeatedly states that you don't want enlightenment, but in contrast to that acknowladged "anti-guru" Jed does an inadequate job of proving that he's enlightened. Ok here an opinion slipped into the mix 3 He gives one process Well this book seems to have mostly positive reviews here, well I would like to add my observations to the mix: Some facts about the book: 1 It's a work of fiction- the author does not exists, there's no ashram, no Jed 2 Just like the actual guru, U.

Ok here an opinion slipped into the mix 3 He gives one process in the book, which he describes as a path "without heart".

Spiritual Enlightenment: The Damnedest Thing MMX

Which basically "trying to write something true untill you do" During the practice you're advised to have an extreme philosophical skepticism. To be honest the internet is a BIG thing so if someone, anyone, would be enlightened by this process which Jed, claims works, in contrast to "all the other practices" there would be someone on the internet to, you know, prove it. Plus his advice might be damaging to people with low mental health true he pretty much makes it obvious but you know, people do not always read between the lines.

He advices a type of epistemological and ontological paranoia, in which the base of our mental life is challanged. In his second book he actually shows how it can be psychologically destructive. And remember there's no money back if it doesn't work for you, and you can't sue someone who doesn't exist View 2 comments.

May 14, Jim rated it it was amazing. I have to say that it has turned my world upside down. I can't explain where I am exactly, but I find myself questioning everything. That's always good, because change is a constant. Where do I go from here? I don't know. Everything I believe is up for review. After reading lots of Eckhart Tolle and Neale Donald Walsch, this is a good wake up call from all the spiritual and enlightenment business.

I love everything about this book. I totally get why the author would remain "anonymous". Both my husband and I devoured this book — so well written and entertaining. Sep 06, Fureto San rated it it was amazing. Great, but not fun at all. Only two disappointing things: 1 I wish it was longer, deeper, meatier.

Because the sequels, as Mr. McKenna slips away from what most people consider to be reality, become less Fulfilling, I guess. Instead, I found my deep, dark inklings confirmed much more eloquently than I could have mustered--which is great, but not so helpful if you're into the acute psychosis brought on by truth being beaten violently into your skull. Mar 28, Frans Baars rated it it was amazing Shelves: further.

In essence a non-dual approach to spirituality, exposing all the ego-constructs that pose as spirituality for what they really are. The last series of books you will ever need to read. But be warned--McKenna is not here to congratulate you on your progress. In fact, he systematically tears apart many of the beliefs spiritual practitioners hold most sacred, and he ruthlessly explains why common spiritual practices are probably holding you back from your professed goal of enlightenment.

A brutally honest wake-up call and a much needed kick in the ass, this book is not for the faint of heart. But if you're willing to face the Truth with a capital T, this book, more than any other book or practice I've encountered, will point you in the right direction. Jan 21, Tuuti rated it it was amazing Shelves: waking-up.

My head hurts, I'm not sure who I am anymore or if I even exist, but I guess that's the point. If there is a point in anything at all. Not sure about that either. Can't really say much else than read it yourself and find out. It's a journey. But maybe you shouldn't take it if you're not interested in truth. This book is full of stories about seekers. I used to be a seeker, too. Gladly it's harder to continue being one after reading this.

The Book that makes everybody depressed - Jed McKenna - Spiritual Enlightenment

What's the point of seeking something that's been under your My head hurts, I'm not sure who I am anymore or if I even exist, but I guess that's the point. What's the point of seeking something that's been under your nose all along? Whether the stories are true or fiction doesn't matter. Whether Jed McKenna exists or not doesn't matter.

Spiritual Enlightenment: The Damnedest Thing MMX by Jed McKenna - Read Online

I found this book to be more true than most non-fiction I've read. They think that this is like school where you have to understand one thing before you can understand the next thing. But all that is about knowing and this is about unknowing. Do you really think that spiritual enlightenment is going to be like an endless orgasm? Heaven on earth? No more problems, no more worries, just sitting around being happy all the time? Oct 14, Jasun Horsley rated it really liked it.

There is much contradiction in the books, though sometimes that seems as much a good thing as not For example, how can a person who claims to have no preference for living over dying have a preference for NY over LA? Does that compute? When McKenna says he hates LA, maybe that is him, the enlightened being, getting all the way into character as McKenna, the false self he has shed?


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The assumption we tend to have is that enlightenment means shedding all negative stuff - but maybe all personal qualities are equally "negative' to a no self self, because equally false. In which case, hating LA could be as valid a way for him to get in character as anything else. That's the argument for the defense anyway, but I'm not sure I believe it myself. Also, if McKenna didn't have some sort of ego-form-personality, there'd be no way to communicate.

McKenna the character seems deliberately contrived to challenge New Age assumptions about how an enlightened being would act - he smokes cigars, eats meat, skydives, eskews meditation and compassion, and so on. There are two questions that overlap: is McKenna the author the same as McKenna the character, and is he enlightened; and is JM, and the descriptions of enlightenment, an accurate depiction of the enlightened state? Also - is it necessarily meant to be assuming that's even possible , or is it meant as something else?

Like Moby Dick is an apparent account of a psychopath but really acc to McKenna a map for truth-realization, perhaps McKenna is couching all his descriptions in a context he deems appropriate for the unawakened reader? And so on. That said, I do have the desire to cry BS sometimes when I read the books - but that could be just an inevitable emotional resistance to some of what he's saying - not least that he is enlightened, and I'm not.